New York says Charter is “just lining its pockets”, revokes Time Warner purchase

by Steve Blum • , ,

The New York state public service commission started the process of unwinding Charter Communications’ purchase of Time Warner Cable systems, in a decision issued on 27 July 2018. The NYPSC says Charter is evading its responsibility to extend its infrastructure and upgrade its service, particularly in rural areas. Those obligations were imposed when the NYPSC gave its blessing to the acquisition.

According to the NYPSC, Charter’s sins include…

  • The company’s repeated failures to meet deadlines;
  • Charter’s attempts to skirt obligations to serve rural communities;
  • Unsafe practices in the field;
  • Its failure to fully commit to its obligations under the 2016 merger agreement; and
  • The company’s purposeful obfuscation of its performance and compliance obligations to the Commission and its customers.

These recurring failures led the Commission to the broader conclusion that the company was not interested in being a good corporate citizen and that the Commission could no longer in good faith and conscience allow it to operate in New York. Today’s actions are meant to address Charter’s failings and to ensure New York has a partner interested in the public good, not just lining its pockets.

Charter’s response was to call the NYPSC’s rhetoric “politically charged” – fake news, in other words. As you might expect, the company is challenging the ruling, and is demanding more details from the NYPSC. According to a story by Alan Breznick in Light Reading

In the company’s second-quarter earnings call…Charter Communications Inc. Chairman & CEO Tom Rutledge made it clear that Charter has no intention of obeying the state Public Service’s Commission order to exit the state because of its allegedly repeated failures to meet its cable buildout and broadband speed commitments. Instead, Rutledge said Charter will try to resolve the conflict with state regulators and, if necessary, will fight the PSC’s actions in court.

“Hopefully we can work it out,” Rutledge said in response to an analyst’s question on the call, noting that it will likely take some time. “But, if necessary, we’ll litigate. We believe we’re in the right.”

It’s just the beginning of the story. The end is months, if not years, away.