FCC approves new broadband subsidy and data collection programs, but each ignores the other

by Steve Blum • , , ,

The Federal Communications Commission will be asking for comments on its plan to spend, at first, $16 billion and eventually $20 billion on rural broadband subsidies, with a minimum speed requirement of 25 Mbps down and 3 Mbps up. It’s also moving ahead with a new broadband availability data collection process, based on electronic map files, rather than spreadsheets. The two initiatives were approved at yesterday’s FCC meeting.

Both democratic commissioners – Jessica Roseworcel and Geoffrey Starks – objected to the republican majority’s blind acceptance of broadband availability data submitted by Internet service providers as a basis for deciding where subsidies should be spent.

Rosenworcel said in a statement that the new subsidy program relies on the same bad data as the old Connect America Fund program…

There’s something fundamentally wrong here. We do not start with maps. We do not start with data. In fact, take a look at the draft rulemaking before us and it barely mentions the fact that we have a separate proceeding we are voting on today involving maps.

In fact, this rulemaking rushes past that effort and simply proposes a successor to our existing Connected America Fund, distributing $16 billion dollars before any new data comes before this agency. Before any new maps are developed. I understand the impulse to move fast. I know that we should be working at warp speed to get modern communications to too many places that have waited too long for digital opportunity. So let’s do it. But let’s commit to doing it right.

This is putting the cart before the horse.

The new availability data collection process should eventually result in more accurate maps, but there’s no firm timeline for it to get underway. Rosenworcel’s objections are a good example of another big problem with it: collecting the data is one thing, but getting agencies to upgrade their systems and their analytical skills to effectively use it is a problem that’s yet to be solved.