California sits out Google anti-trust investigation

by Steve Blum • , , ,

Attorneys general from forty-eight states, plus the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, launched a joint anti-trust investigation against Google on Monday, looking specifically at how the company handles online advertising. The group isn’t accusing Google of anything in particular yet, but they have their suspicions and if those prove out, an anti-trust lawsuit is sure to follow.

Only two states opted out of the investigation: Alabama and California. The absence of California attorney general Xavier Becerra from the group is puzzling to many, and he isn’t offering any hints. According to a story in the Los Angeles Times by Suhauna Hussain, maybe Becerra has something else up his sleeve…

Citing a need to protect the integrity of “potential and ongoing investigations,” Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra declined to say why he refused to join the chief law enforcement officers of 48 other states, plus Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico, in examining the Mountain View-based internet giant’s dominance in online advertising.

Or maybe he has something else on his mind…

As a candidate for the House of Representatives, Becerra was the recipient of considerable largess from Google. From 2010 through 2016, Becerra’s campaign received $23,000 from Google’s corporate political action committee, Google Inc. NetPAC, according to Federal Election Committee records. Two Google executives donated $2,600 and $5,300, respectively, to Becerra’s campaigns over that span. Google also contributed $7,300 to Becerra’s 2018 campaign for attorney general, and $3,000 to Marshall’s, according to data from FollowTheMoney.org.

Another consideration is California’s new privacy law, which is of particular interest to online companies. Becerra is responsible for coming up with new rules and procedures, and enforcing them when the law takes effect in January. So he might be in some kind of legal or policy arm wrestling match with Google already. There are also two days left to go on the California legislature’s 2019 regular session, and there are bills in the hopper that could change that privacy law, in one direction or the other. Or both.