Tag Archives: race telecommunications

CPUC debunks Frontier’s service claims, approves FTTH grant in Phelan

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The high desert community of Phelan, in San Bernardino County, will get gigabit class fiber to the home service. The California Public Utilities Commission voted four to one yesterday to approve a $28 million grant to Race Telecommunications, which will cover 60% of the cost of building the project. The single no came from commission president Michael Picker.

The decision had been delayed two weeks, while Race and Frontier Communications explored ways they might work together. That discussion came at the request of commissioners, who were trying to avoid spending state money in an area that was also getting federal subsidies, albeit for relatively minor upgrades to ageing DSL systems that will not meet the CPUC’s minimum standards.

The CPUC also did some ground truthing and discovered Frontier’s service claims did not line up with reality, according to commissioner Clifford Rechtschaffen…

Since our last meeting [CPUC staff] has gone down to Phelan’s central business district and established that they are in fact going forward with their upgrades to some households and businesses. They also though, and this I think is quite significant, they determined based on the engineering constraints of the project, that Frontier’s upgrade would not reach nearly 100% of the community not even the 85% that we thought before, but more like 60%. So 40% of the community would not be served. And that’s very significant. That means that we have a significant portion of the community would not be served in an area that we have identified as our highest priority.

But Rechtschaffen also warned that the Phelan project shouldn’t set a precedent, and other pending projects should be looked at differently.

The backlog of proposals for California Advanced Services Fund subsidies is being whittled down. Four grant applications are still pending, and only one of those – a middle mile project proposed by Ducor Telephone in the Tulare County mountain community of Kennedy Meadows – is completely outside of the current phase of the federal Connect America Fund subsidy program. Although, as a small rural telephone company, Ducor has access to money from related federal programs.

The other pending projects – Connect Anza in Riverside County, Vandyland in Santa Barbara County and Las Cumbres in Santa Cruz County – are, like Phelan, in the former Verizon territories acquired by Frontier and share some overlap with federally funded areas.

San Bernardino FTTH decision delayed again

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The California Public Utilities Commission couldn’t come to a decision yesterday on a $28 million grant from the for a fiber to the home project in the San Bernardino County community of Phelan. Despite false starts and nearly two years of review, commissioners put off a vote on Race Telecommunications’ Gigafy Phelan proposal until at least their next meeting.

They were responding to a stream of late protests from Frontier Communications, which is getting federal subsidies to upgrade service to some of the same homes. That federally subsidised service, though, doesn’t have to offer anything better than 10 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload speeds, which doesn’t meet the CPUC’s minimum standard of 6 Mbps down and 1.5 Mbps up. And there’s no way of guaranteeing what Frontier will deliver in the portions of the project area that are not eligible for federal money.

Most of the commissioners seemed to support the project, at one level or another. Commissioner Liane Randolph said it should go forward…

It’s an appropriate project for CASF funds, the applicant has met all of the requirements, it’s an area that needs service. I understand the concern about the [federal] funds. But, to staff’s point, you don’t want to discourage applicants from proposing projects in areas that are identified as needing service and then having the rug pulled out from under them after another applicant comes in after the protest period. So I feel that for appropriate management of the program, providing better service to the community, I am comfortable with this project. And if and when it comes back, I’m going to be supportive of it.

There were questions about where Frontier is building out, how it can use the federal money, and whether or not some level of cooperation between them and Race is possible. CPUC president Michael Picker, who usually votes against infrastructure grants when an incumbent isn’t involved, had even more questions. Which could also mean even more delays. That could be a problem, as commissioner Carla Peterman pointed out…

I do have some concern that if we delay this matter indefinitely, then this project may not be there and this community will be in the same place with the same digital divide issue it currently suffers from.

The next CPUC meeting is scheduled for 13 July 2017.

Case against San Bernardino FTTH embraces low federal expectations

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A proposed $28 million grant for a fiber to the home project in the Phelan area of San Bernardino County has drawn two formal challenges. One, from Frontier Communications, was completely predictable, but the other, from the California Public Utilities Commission’s office of ratepayer advocates (ORA), was somewhat unexpected.

Only somewhat, because ORA has a track record of sporadically opposing grants for FTTH systems from the California Advanced Services Fund (CASF). However, its objections usually second guess design or budget decisions. This time though, ORA is taking Frontier’s side, arguing that CASF subsidies shouldn’t be given for projects in areas where incumbents are getting federal money via the Connect America Fund program.

There are two big problems with that argument. First, the federal money generally pays for minimal upgrades to existing, and typically antiquated, broadband infrastructure. To get the money, Frontier only has to commit to providing service at 10 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload speeds. In other words, substandard service that leaves communities underserved by the CPUC’s minimum benchmark of 6 Mbps down and 1.5 Mbps up, and therefor eligible for CASF money.

ORA makes much of Frontier’s claims that it can do better, but if this project is approved, Race Telecommunications will offer gigabit service for $60 a month to every home in its footprint. And that’s an enforceable obligation, since it’s tied to the grant money. Frontier, on the other hand, can’t be forced to deliver on its half promises about speeds and it’s making no commitments about prices.

Second, Frontier won’t be serving all the homes in Race’s proposed project area: the federal money is scattered around a checker board of census blocks, per the map above. Some people will be left without broadband service at all, and others will end up with speeds that wouldn’t have been considered sufficient ten years ago, let alone today.

The real problem is that the federal program is poorly designed. It pays for propping up incumbents’ slow service, out of date infrastructure and inconsistent deployment. If the aim is to avoid overlapping subsidies, then it’s the federal money that should be spent elsewhere. Its increasingly aggressive rhetoric and lawyerly intimidation notwithstanding, Frontier does not own exclusive rights to the Phelan community. The people – the ratepayers – there deserve advocacy too.

$900K chopped from San Bernardino FTTH subsidy plan, but it’s moving again

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A fiber to the home project in San Bernardino County is back on track, sorta. California Public Utilities Commission staff cut $900,000 from a proposed $29 million grant to Race Telecommunications for the Gigafy Phelan project, and sent it all back into a 30 day comment, reply and commission consideration cycle.

Gigafy Phelan is an ambitious attempt to extend FTTH service to 8,400 homes in California’s high desert region, in and around the town of Phelan. Or maybe it’s 7,600 homes. It depends on how homes is defined, and in this case it’s more than academic. It makes a $900,000 difference.

The federal census bureau tracks housing units and households. A housing unit is a discrete structure where people might live: “a house, an apartment, a mobile home or trailer, a group of rooms, or a single room that is occupied, or, if vacant, is intended for occupancy as separate living quarters", as the census bureau, as quoted by CPUC staff, puts it. A household is an occupied housing unit, regardless of the number of occupants or the relationships between them.

The California Advanced Service Fund – the broadband subsidy program that would pick up the tab – uses households as its primary metric. Housing units is a better measure, since a home that’s unoccupied today is as likely to be occupied tomorrow as any other, and everyone needs broadband service. But it’s just a way of keeping score and, so long as it’s done consistently, one way works pretty much as well as another.

It’s also a poor excuse for whittling down an FTTH project at the 11th hour, particularly one that delivers a gigabit for $60 a month and is the second "highest-scoring pending project application on the CASF’s project evaluation scoring matrix".

The revisions open up a window for another round of protests, and you can expect Frontier Communications will continue to object, claiming that its substandard, 10 Mbps down/1 Mbps up, federally subsidised service – at no particular price point – is enough for people who live in Phelan. The A in CASF stands for Advanced services. It’s time to get on with it.

One CASF grant approved, one released and one on hold

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A $511,000 broadband upgrade grant for a cable system owned by CalNeva in Fresno County was unanimously approved by the California Public Utilities Commission at its 11 May 2017 meeting. The commission also signed off on environmental clearances and released $17 million in grant and loan subsidies for the Bright Fiber FTTH project in Nevada County. The $29 million proposal by Race Telecommunications for an FTTH system in the Phelan area, in San Bernardino County was bumped to the commission’s 25 May 2017 meeting.

Frontier Communications hates double dipping, unless it’s licking the cone

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As might be expected, Frontier Communications objects to a proposed $29 million California Advanced Services Fund subsidy for a fiber to the home project in its San Bernardino County territory. Its first instinct was to try to a backdoor approach at the California Public Utilities Commission, but that was rebuffed. So yesterday Frontier filed formal comments urging the CPUC to kill the Gigafy Phelan project when it comes up for a vote next week.

There are a few problems with its arguments against it.

First, it claims it’s going to upgrade the area that Race Telecommunications wants to serve. Well, not the entire area. Only 60% of the homes. And Frontier is very careful not to mention what that upgraded service will be. That’s because it’s only willing to commit to meeting a federal subsidy program’s 10 Mbps download/1 Mbps upload standard, as its previous filings at the CPUC have made abundantly clear. That service level does not meet the CPUC’s 6 Mbps down/1.5 Mbps up minimum. So even if the upgrade is completed in August, Frontier’s service in the Phelan area will still be substandard, for both the 40% of homes it’s bypassing and for many, if not all, of the remaining 60%.

Second, it makes a very odd argument against tapping two subsidy programs in one area. The CASF grant, which would give a gigabit to 100% of the homes in the project area, comes from California taxpayers, who also contribute to the federal Connect America Fund program that is financing Frontier’s substandard upgrade. It’s a fair point that taxpayers should only be paying for one broadband upgrade project, but should it be the one that offers a gigabit for $60 a month or the one that’ll lock in ten or twenty year old technology for the next twenty or thirty years?

There’s no way that Frontier will pass up that money, though. In fact, it doesn’t pass up money even when it means engaging in the kind of double dipping that it so piously objects to in its letter to the CPUC. In 2015, Frontier pursued, and received, CASF and federal subsidies to prop up its ageing DSL infrastructure in the Humboldt County town of Petrolia.

Frontier is entitled to play subsidies as dealt. But it’s gross hypocrisy to complain about the game when the other guy ends up with better cards.

Gigabit fiber in San Bernardino County heads for CPUC vote

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A fiber to the premise project for San Bernardino County – largest yet – is scheduled to go in front of the California Public Utilities Commission in May. A draft resolution was published on Friday, which proposes to award $29 million to Race Telecommunications from the California Advanced Services Fund (CASF) to build an FTTP system in and around the San Bernardino County communities of Phelan, Piñon Hills, Oak Hills and Hesperia.

As designed, it would pass 8,400 homes, which is “the most households ever given access by a CASF-subsidized last-mile project”, according to the draft. Race is projecting a 68% take rate, which amounts to 5,700 subscribers. Another 85 potential business and institutional customers will also be reachable via the system. The subsidy comes out to $3,400 per premise, which is in line with past CASF-funded FTTP projects. In the past two years, the CPUC has approved $48 million for eleven FTTP proposals totalling 12,400 homes, a $3,900 average all up. On a project basis, the median subsidy $7,000.

As with its past CASF-subsidised projects – Race has received eight CASF grants and completed work on four – its plan calls for offering symmetrical gigabit service for $60 a month to residences. Businesses would pay $200 for 100 Mbps service. There’s no mention of data caps for either.

The Phelan project also marked another first for the CASF project. After Race submitted its initial application for a $48 million subsidy, Ultimate Internet Access – another ISP with a CASF track record – submitted a competing proposal, which would have cost less than half that. During the ensuing months of back and forth discussions, the project area was adjusted and costs were trimmed. Race came back initially with a $23 million subsidy request, but after further changes to project plans and service area the final tab ended up at $29 million.

Two more eastern California towns in line for FTTH

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Bridgeport and Walker in northern Mono County will get gigabit-class fiber to the home service, if the California Public Utilities Commission votes to approve a $3.1 million grant from the California Advanced Services Fund (CASF), as recommended by a long delayed draft resolution prepared by staff.

The grant would go to Race Telecommunications, which has been building fiber to the home systems along and near the Digital 395 middle mile fiber route. Both the last mile systems and Digital 395 have benefited from CASF subsidies and, in the case of the Digital 395 project, a federal broadband stimulus grant.

Combined, the two towns have 444 homes which do not have access to broadband service at the CPUC’s minimum standard of 6 Mbps download and 1.5 Mbps upload speeds. Originally, another 125 homes in Coleville – four miles to the north of Walker – was included in the proposal, but was removed because Frontier Communications had exercised its right of first refusal under CASF rules, and promised to upgrade the town. As a result, Coleville will be left out of the FTTH project.

People living in Bridgeport and Walker, though, will be able to buy symmetrical gigabit service for $100 a month, as well as tiers at slower speeds, starting at $25 per month for symmetrical 25 Mbps service.

The Gigafy North 395 project was proposed by Race almost two years ago, on 31 December 2014. The CPUC is expected to vote on it at its 1 December 2016 meeting. At that point, it will be nearly 600 days late – CASF rules, as approved by the commission, set a 106 day deadline for staff to process a grant application and either reject it or get it in front of commissioners for a vote. Even if you start the clock counting from the point where the Frontier-served homes in Coleville were pulled out, the resolution is still more than a year overdue. Welcome, but overdue.

Reboot for dueling San Bernardino FTTH projects

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Frontier’s federal CAF2 subsidised census blocks.

Two competing proposals to build a fiber to the home system in the San Bernardino County town of Phelan and surrounding communities are now a lot closer to meeting in the middle.

More than a year ago, in August 2015, Race Telecommunications submitted a proposal asking the California Public Utilities Commission for a $48 million grant from the California Advanced Services Fund (CASF) for its Gigafy Phelan project – that’s 60% of the then-estimated construction cost to reach about 10,000 homes with fiber. In January, Ultimate Internet Access filed an application for a $21 million subsidy to serve more or less the same number of homes in more or less the same area.

In the ensuing months, both companies have been in discussions with CPUC staff. As a result, UIA bumped up its request by $662,000 and Race slashed its proposal by more than half, to $23 million, and reduced the subsidised share from 60% of construction costs to 50%.

The CPUC posted the revised project descriptions last week, giving incumbents another formal chance to challenge the applicants’ position that the area is underserved, in other words the broadband service that’s available now doesn’t meet the minimum CASF standard of 6 Mbps download and 1.5 Mbps upload speeds. As a matter of practice, though, incumbents are allowed to challenge a CASF project proposal right up until the time the commission votes on whether or not to approve it.

Facts on the ground have changed somewhat over the past year. Frontier Communications has taken ownership of the telephone system serving the area, and has accepted federal subsidies to upgrade broadband service in much of it to at least the FCC’s 10 Mbps download and 1 Mbps upload speed standard. Charter Communications, which offers video but not Internet service, is under a CPUC order to upgrade its TV-only systems in California to broadband capability, at a minimum of 60 Mbps download speeds. Neither upgrade has actually happened yet, though.

CPUC okays grants for Occidental FTTH, consortia, public housing; cancels dormant projects

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With no discussion and plenty of advocates in attendance, the California Public Utilities Commission unanimously approved a $7.7 million construction subsidy for a fiber to the home project in Occidental and grants for three regional broadband consortia and 12 public housing programs. It also rescinded five previously approved but currently stalled California Advanced Services Fund infrastructure projects, putting $4.5 million back into the kitty. More details here.