Tag Archives: brentwood

Brentwood FTTH ordinance posted on muni broadband policy bank

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A decision made in 1999 led to a fiber to the home system for Brentwood, California in 2015. Or at least the beginnings of one. Sonic.net is building an FTTH network using conduit installed by developers and deeded over to the City as they built new homes over the past 16 years, the result of an advanced technology systems ordinance that the Brentwood City Council added to its land development code in 1999…

The developer shall design, install, test, and dedicate to the City two advanced technology system conduits, size to be determined, within the public right of way. The developer shall install, in one of the conduits, a fiber optic system designed to serve the subject development for use by the City of Brentwood or one of its licensed franchisee…The second conduit shall remain empty and shall be reserved to serve the subject development for the use of a City licensed franchisee not wishing to utilize the City’s fiber optic system. Both conduits shall be installed to each lot line…

The developer shall design, install, test, and dedicate to the property owner two advanced technology system conduits, size to be determined, to connect the public advanced technology system to the individual home or building. The developer shall install, in one of the conduits, a fiber optic system designed to serve the subject property.

That was back when Brentwood was a sleepy little town surrounded by east Contra Costa County farmland. It boomed over the next few years, and with it came new, fiber ready homes.

I’ve posted the original ordinance, along with the accompanying staff report and council resolution from 9 February 1999, the enacting resolution approved two weeks later, a follow up report from next year, and the most current version of the City’s engineering procedures manual, which contains the referenced specifications. It’s very good work and far thinking: it’s as fresh and original today as it was in 1999.

Much thanks goes to Margaret Wimberly, Brentwood’s City Clerk, who dug the documents out of the archives. Sixteen years is too far back for the City’s online system, so she had to do some old fashioned leg work to find them. It’s an under-appreciated skill these days.

Both pdf and doc versions are now up on the Municipal Broadband Policy Bank page, except for the engineering manual, which is pdf only. I did the Word conversion from the pdf originals, any errors are strictly my own.

Smart decision 15 years ago brings $40 FTTH to Brentwood now

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The biggest independent Internet service provider in northern California is building a fiber-to-the-home (and business) system in Brentwood. The eastern Contra Costa County city gave Sonic.net permission to use more than a hundred miles of conduit…

In 1999 the City implemented a requirement that all new development in the City be constructed with conduit to the home/business via the joint trench. The conduits were then dedicated to the City for future use. The City now has approximately 120–150 miles of City owned conduit reaching over 8,000 homes in addition to all commercial areas constructed over the past 15 years.

The basic selling proposition is a gigabit for $40 with unlimited phone service thrown in. Or residents with conduit will have the option of paying an upfront fee – in the $300 to $400 range according to Karl Bode at DSL Reports – and getting 5 Mbps service for five years for no additional costs. Newer neighborhoods with existing conduit will be prioritised on the basis of interest; at least one older neighborhood will be retrofitted with others to follow if there are enough pre-sign-ups. All very similar to Google in Kansas City.

The deal includes free fiber hookups for the City and other public facilities such as schools and fire stations. Homes that don’t get fiber will be offered 20 Mbps (and unlimited phone service) via copper, also for $40 per month. Sonic has committed to starting work in two months, lighting up the first customers within nine and finishing it all off in fifteen.