Tag Archives: fttp

Santa Cruz gets more fiber, more gigabit service

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AT&T’s recent fiber to the home (FTTH) upgrades in Santa Cruz mean that Cruzio isn’t the only Internet service provider bringing gigabit class infrastructure into town (unless you have a sneaking suspicion that it’s a competitive response – in that case you can thank Cruzio for it too). U.C. Santa Cruz’s Jim Warner tracked it down…

AT&T has been working on an FTTH deployment in parts of west Santa Cruz. The work has progressed to the point where some addresses are showing availability of gigabit service in AT&T’s on-line service availability tool. When you enter a “good” address – one where gigabit service is already available – you see, among other things, a web offer for “fiber” service at 100 Mbps and 1,000 Mbps download and upload speeds (subject to the usual disclaimer: “actual customer speeds may vary and are not guaranteed”).

The 100 Mbps packages is capped at 1 terabyte a month; the gigabit package offers “unlimited data”.

An example of what FTTH looks like “on the pole” is in the picture above. The thin curved lines that appear to loop back into the new tap are not fibers. They are simply plastic retainers to keep the protective caps from falling to the ground. To be ready to serve any address, one of the taps needs to be placed on almost every pole.

It is harder to see what’s going on underground. We need to wait for details about the project to know if areas where utilities are underground (rather than on poles) will be included.

The quality of AT&T’s craftsmanship is highly variable and not all of it looks as clean as in the picture presented. So far, I’ve seen FTTH work in the area bounded by Walnut Ave., California St., Almar Ave. and King St. This is a poor way to gauge the scope of their project, though. I visited the AT&T retail store but discovered staff get no special advance information about what the company is working on.

Wireline carriers, such as AT&T and Comcast, each get one foot of vertical space on each pole for their service. AT&T has attached their new fiber network to their legacy copper network to avoid needing to completely rearrange the pole or pay for another foot of pole space.

San Francisco muni FTTP short list is down to three choices

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The City and County of San Francisco is still tight-lipped regarding details of its $2 billion fiber-to-the-premise project, but its latest cryptic update indicates that the scheduled one-on-one interviews with potential bidders are complete and the first cut was made.

Thanks to a tip from a kind reader, I checked the City’s purchasing website and found this notice, dated yesterday, 19 April 2018…

Notice of Pre-Qualified Bidders for Citywide Fiber to the Premises Network, Lit Fiber and Wi-Fi Services RFQ

The City has completed its evaluation of Citywide Fiber to the Premises Network, Lit Fiber and Wi-Fi Services RFQ. Respondent Teams that are selected and placed on the pre-qualified bidders list are not guaranteed a contract. The following Respondent Teams have been selected:

Bay City Broadband Partners
FiberGateway
Sonic Plenary SF Fiber

Protests of the Pre-Qualified Bidders for this RFQ must be received…no later than 12:00 P.M. (PST) on April 26, 2018.

Before the interviews, the City acknowledged that four groups were in the hunt. This latest list is missing Golden Gate Broadband Partners, of which no public information or even basis for speculation exists. Same story with FiberGateway, unless you count the fact that a cable operator, Altice, uses it as a brand name.

Bay City Broadband Partners is claimed by a local wireless Internet service provider, Monkey Brains, and is said to include Nokia, Zayo and Black and Veatch. As far as I know, Sonic.net hasn’t said anything publicly but it isn’t a stretch to suspect they’re leading Sonic Plenary SF Fiber.

The three remaining contenders are still a long way from getting any kind of a contract. Later this year, the City will issue a formal request for proposals, and only the three blessed “respondent teams” will be eligible to bid. Although the City indicated it would be contributing money to the project, it hasn’t said how much.

A little more light shed on San Francisco muni FTTP contenders

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The City and County of San Francisco has released a little bit of information about the companies that are vying for a $2 billion municipal fiber to the premise (FTTP) project. (Okay, they say it’s $1.9 billion, but at this early stage in the game, the rounder and higher $2 billion figure probably describes it better).

A cryptic post buried on the City’s purchasing website says…

Notice of Shortlist of Respondent Teams selected for Oral Interviews for the Citywide Fiber to Premises Network, Lit Fiber & Wi-fi Services RFQ

The written proposal evaluation for the Citywide Fiber to Premises Network, Lit Fiber & Wi-fi Services RFQ is now complete. The following firms will be invited to the Oral Interviews: Bay City Broadband Partners, FiberGateway, Golden Gate Broadband Partners, and Sonic Plenary SF Fiber.

And that’s it. So in the absence of hard information, we can try to read the tea leaves. The only statements about the written responses to the City’s request for qualifications submitted on or before 26 March 2017 have come from Monkey Brains, a San Francisco wireless Internet service provider. In a tweet and a subsequent newspaper interview, Monkey Brains owner Rudy Rucker said that five groups submitted proposals. One of those groups – Bay City Broadband Partners – includes Monkey Brains and, according to Rucker, Black and Veatch, Zayo and Nokia.

It’s a fair guess – but only a guess – that Sonic Plenary SF Fiber is led by Sonic.net, which is already in the business of building out its own FTTP system in San Francisco. No word yet from Sonic.net, though.

I don’t have any idea at all who’s behind Golden Gate Broadband Partners. A google search didn’t turn up any company that operates under that name, and it’s generic enough that it could be anybody. Same with FiberGateway – no company by that name – but tantalisingly, Altice, a mid-sized U.S. (and huge-sized European) cable company uses that brand name for its router and associated management app. At this point, though, it would be an egregious stretch to infer a connection.

Presumably, one of the written proposals was rejected out of hand. So only four groups are moving on to the oral interview round of the competition, which is scheduled to happen next week. After that, the City will finalise a list of qualified bidders who will be allowed to submit firm responses to a request for proposals that’ll be released later this year.

Handful of hopefuls chase contract to light San Francisco FTTP

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Five groups are in the hunt for San Francisco’s citywide fiber to the premise (FTTP) project, at least according to one of the bidders. Monkeybrains, a San Francisco-based wireless Internet service provider, tweeted that they’re on one of the five teams that submitted proposals.

The deadline for filing responses to the City and County of San Francisco’s request for qualifications (RFQ) was last week. According to the San Francisco Examiner, Monkeybrains is talking, but no one else is saying much of anything about it…

Rudy Rucker, who founded Monkeybrains in 1998 with Alex Menendez…that they are part of one team of companies that submitted by last week’s deadline…

“Monkeybrains has teamed up with Black and Veatch, Zayo and Nokia,” Rucker said in an email. “I don’t know all the other teams … but I think we have a very strong team"…

“The City received several bids and we are impressed by the seriousness of the bid teams and their submissions,” [San Francisco mayor Mark Farrell] told the Examiner last week. “We look forward to reviewing the bids in detail and moving full-steam ahead with our procurement process.”

San Francisco voters will have the final say as to whether the City backs an FTTP project financially. The nominal business model calls for a private company to build and operate an open access, citywide FTTP system that would be run according to policies and practices laid down by the City. The total $1.9 billion cost works out to $51 per residence per month and $73 per business, and the City says it – or rather, taxpayers – will pick up some of the tab. It’s not saying how much, but it won’t be chump change and some kind of new, voter-approved tax is the only clear path to paying it.

At this stage, everything is still theoretical. The RFQ is only aimed at developing a short list of qualified bidders who will, presumably, submit hard proposals later this year. We might get a clue as to who’s in the running on Monday, when the City is scheduled to notify bid teams that they’re moving on to the next step of the process, which is one on one interviews.

San Francisco willing to pay for citywide FTTP, but not saying how much

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The City and County of San Francisco wants a short list of companies willing to build an open access, wholesale fiber-to-the-premise system that reaches all homes and businesses. It posted a request for qualifications (RFQ) yesterday, asking potential partners to make their pitches, with the idea of winnowing the responses down to a handful that will go on to a second and final round of proposals later this year.

Unlike Los Angeles, San Francisco is making an upfront offer to subsidise at least some of the costs. In return, it wants a big say in how the system is run, including setting terms to sell capacity on the system to third party “retail service providers” (RSPs) that will, in turn, serve end users…

The City desires a state-of-the-art FTTP network capable of delivering a minimum of a gigabit to consumer premises, and scalable to higher speeds over time as the market develops. The network should include fully fiber connections to the premises that provides ubiquitous data, voice, video services to all communities in San Francisco and offers a choice of competitive private RSPs. The City also seeks to achieve construction and operations efficiencies wherever possible and to build and operate the network at the lowest possible cost.

A study released last October estimated the total construction tab at $1.9 billion or, put another way, a “connection fee” of $51 per home per month and $73 per business per month, which would also cover some operating costs.

The RFQ doesn’t put it on the table, though. The City is offering undefined lump sum payments based on construction milestones and ongoing service fees, but the wholesale partner will also have to depend on income from RSPs and other telecoms companies that want to lease capacity. It’ll share that revenue with the City and, according to the RFQ, is “expected to assume the full performance risk” of the project and “share in City’s financial risk including revenue risk, market risk and uptake risk”.

Responses are due 26 March 2018.

City and County of San Francisco request for qualifications for citywide fiber to the premises network, lit fiber and wi-fi services, 31 January 2018.

The potential for ubiquitous, open fiber-to-the-premises in San Francisco, CTC Technology & Energy and IMG Rebel, 17 October 2017.

City and County of San Francisco, financial analysis of options for a municipal fiber optic network for citywide Internet access, 15 March 2016.

Link to the City’s web page, which provides access to all documents and updates.

AT&T paints false fiber picture with official service reports

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Fiber claims but copper service levels.

There’s something odd about the broadband availability data that AT&T submits to the California Public Utilities Commission. While doing research for the Broadband Infrastructure Assessment and Action Plan I recently completed for the City of West Sacramento (and from which this blog post liberally borrows), I noticed that AT&T claims to provide fiber-to-the-premise service (FTTP), and only FTTP service, in 31 West Sacramento census blocks, which represents 6% of AT&T’s service area.

These census blocks generally correspond to recently developed areas or areas that are targeted for future development. The kind of greenfield construction work where AT&T and other telecoms companies routinely use fiber. But it seems that FTTP coverage in these blocks is partial at best, and many, if not most, homes still receive service via copper wires.

In effect, AT&T is inaccurately reporting that all 31 of these census blocks are completely served by fiber infrastructure, and is not reporting the other types of technologies present. By contrast, in census blocks where only copper-based service is available, AT&T will report multiple technologies, for example VDSL and legacy DSL, if both are present.

A couple of things might be going on. It’s possible that AT&T is just being lazy and only reporting its marquee service levels in any given census block. But it’s also possible that it reflects the new and misleading “Fiber” brand it’s slapping on copper-based service. Or rather foreshadows it, since the reports predated the rebranding. The rationale appears to be that the service is delivered via fiber to central locations within neighborhoods – often referred to as nodes – with the final link accomplished using copper wires. But that’s fiber-to-the-node – FTTN – and not FTTP.

It’s probably a lost cause to try to get AT&T and other telecoms companies to stop playing these kinds of word games, but that doesn’t mean everyone else has to play them too. Insist on the truth.

Gigabit fiber in San Bernardino County heads for CPUC vote

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A fiber to the premise project for San Bernardino County – largest yet – is scheduled to go in front of the California Public Utilities Commission in May. A draft resolution was published on Friday, which proposes to award $29 million to Race Telecommunications from the California Advanced Services Fund (CASF) to build an FTTP system in and around the San Bernardino County communities of Phelan, Piñon Hills, Oak Hills and Hesperia.

As designed, it would pass 8,400 homes, which is “the most households ever given access by a CASF-subsidized last-mile project”, according to the draft. Race is projecting a 68% take rate, which amounts to 5,700 subscribers. Another 85 potential business and institutional customers will also be reachable via the system. The subsidy comes out to $3,400 per premise, which is in line with past CASF-funded FTTP projects. In the past two years, the CPUC has approved $48 million for eleven FTTP proposals totalling 12,400 homes, a $3,900 average all up. On a project basis, the median subsidy $7,000.

As with its past CASF-subsidised projects – Race has received eight CASF grants and completed work on four – its plan calls for offering symmetrical gigabit service for $60 a month to residences. Businesses would pay $200 for 100 Mbps service. There’s no mention of data caps for either.

The Phelan project also marked another first for the CASF project. After Race submitted its initial application for a $48 million subsidy, Ultimate Internet Access – another ISP with a CASF track record – submitted a competing proposal, which would have cost less than half that. During the ensuing months of back and forth discussions, the project area was adjusted and costs were trimmed. Race came back initially with a $23 million subsidy request, but after further changes to project plans and service area the final tab ended up at $29 million.

Muni broadband endorsed by Comcast, again

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Comcast jumps on board.

Are you wondering whether or not you live in a place where Comcast will soon upgrade at least some of its broadband infrastructure and technology to the high speed, DOCSIS 3.1 standard? All you have to do is check to see whether there’s a municipal broadband project underway nearby. That’s a very reliable way to gauge the esteem that Comcast bestows upon your town.

According to a story by Daniel Frankel in FierceCable, Chattanooga, Tennessee is the next stop on Comcast’s DOCSIS 3.1 road trip, where it will begin offer much cheaper 1 gigabit service to homes and businesses…

Comcast had been delivering its pricey 10-gig fiber service to local Chattanooga businesses, and 2-gig fiber service to local residences. The DOCSIS 3.1 products are much cheaper, starting out at around $140 a month without contract.

Chattanooga’s publicly owned electric utility built a fiber to the premise system and began offering gigabit speeds in 2010, with faster service following in later years. The project, which was initially funded by a $100 million federal stimulus grant, has been credited with amping up Chattanooga’s economic mojo, with neighboring communities begging for the network to be extended.

Comcast’s Chattanooga announcement comes a week after it promised a DOCSIS 3.1 upgrade in Huntsville, Alabama, which also has a municipal electric utility in the process of building an FTTP system, which will be operated by Google Fiber. Huntsville and Chattanooga join a very short and select list of Comcast DOCSIS 3.1 upgrade targets, which includes two other Google Fiber cities, Nashville and Atlanta.

It’ll be interesting to see what Comcast does with its pricing. The Chattanooga muni system offers a gigabit to residential customers for $70 a month, half of Comcast’s standard rate. On the other hand, Comcast can spread costs and generate profits from a wide range of video and other services, over a nationwide footprint. There would seem to be little point for it to go head to head with a muni system if it wasn’t planning to use that market power to the max.

The copper GigaWeasel lurks under AT&T’s fiber umbrella

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You can see the fiber from here.

AT&T is casting a new shadow on its faster-than-average tiers of service. Instead of calling 300 Mbps copper service Gigapower, it’ll now lounge under the AT&T Fiber umbrella. At least that’s how an AT&T press release reads, when you connect all the dots.

The release says

Under the AT&T Fiber umbrella brand we will use a variety of network technologies to connect more homes, apartments and business customer locations to ultra-fast and low-latency internet speeds. This new brand includes, but is not limited to, the former AT&T GigaPower network. We will announce additional network technologies and products in our AT&T Fiber umbrella brand in the near future.

When AT&T starts talking about “a variety of network technologies” under an “umbrella brand”, whatever that is, you can bet the ranch that the roads won’t be clogged with AT&T fiber trucks. Particularly if you live on a ranch.

The GigaWeasel, sorry, GigaPower brand was introduced in Austin, as AT&T scrambled to respond to Google Fiber’s imminent arrival. There probably are some places where you can get fiber-to-the-premise gigabit service in Austin and the several dozen metro areas where AT&T subsequently claimed to be offering it. Probably. But if you live or work on one of the lucky streets where GigaPower service is available, there’s an excellent chance you’d be told the best you can get is 300 Mbps via copper lines.

There’s glass in the network somewhere, so that’s apparently enough for AT&T’s flacks to claim that last mile copper comes under the fiber umbrella.

There’s no mystery about what AT&T is doing. It’s made it clear that high potential areas like dense central business districts and wealthy neighborhoods will get the loving attention of its capital investments – fiber, in other words – while merely affluent customers will get to keep their copper-based service, with or without a fiber umbrella. Rural and inner city communities don’t even have that much to look forward to: as wireless towers go up, copper lines will come down.

Fiber gets you more than copper, and copper gets you more than wireless. That’s basic physics and word games won’t change it.

Muni fiber build RFP issued by Union City, California

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A lot of long haul fiber criss-crosses through Union City, a town of about 70,000 people tucked in between Hayward and Fremont in the East Bay area, just north of Silicon Valley. The City of Union City has issued a request for proposals from companies interested in bidding to “design and install a high-speed dark fiber network in City-owned conduit” to take advantage of that wealth, and to spur development of a new business and residential area…

The Union City Station District is a high-density development area located around the Union City BART Station. At buildout, the Station District will have 1.2 million square feet of office and 850+ residential units and live-work space along 11th Street.

An adjacent 80-acre in the greater Station District area is undeveloped and underdeveloped with some public streets. This area is zoned for new office, research and development, and flex-industrial businesses. Conduit and fiber will need to be installed in this area as new streets and additional points of access are built to accommodate the growth in a second phase of design and installation of a City-owned high-speed fiber network.

That high speed network will be built from a base that includes several more miles of city-owned conduit, and adjacent and intersecting middle mile fiber, including routes owned or operated by BART, PG&E, Level 3, Zayo, OpticAccess, AT&T, Verizon and XO Communications.

To answer the first question that always gets asked, yes, the City has a budget for it.

The deadline for questions is 11 October 2016 and proposals must be submitted by 18 October 2016. The RFP documents include the required elements for responses, as well as maps and plans of the area.

The official documents can be downloaded here, and that’s where any updates will be posted. If you’re just curious, here are direct download links that are current, as of today:

RFP for high speed fiber in the Union City Station District
Exhibit A
Exhibit B
Exhibit C

Tellus Venture Associates assisted the City of Union City in identifying the market opportunity and in developing the RFP. I’m not a disinterested commentator. Take it for what it’s worth.